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ENGL1011:代寫 Introduction to Film Studies代寫

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  • ENGL1011:代寫 Introduction to Film Studies代寫
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
    School: School of Literature, Art and Media
    Program: Film Studies
    Unit of Study: ENGL1011: Introduction to Film Studies
    Session: Semester 2, 2016
    Unit of Study Outline
    Arrival of a Train at a Station (The Lumière Brothers, 1895) [Image: thefilmstage.com]
    Hugo (Martin Scorsese, 2011)
    Unit Coordinators
    Unit coordinators are listed on undergraduate and postgraduate coursework semester timetables, and
    can be consulted for help with any difficulties you may have.
    Unit coordinators (as well as the Faculty) should also be informed of any illness or other misadventure
    that leads students to miss classes and tutorials or be late with assignments.
    Unit Coordinator: Dr Sarah Gleeson-White
    Location: Room N323, Woolley Building (A20)
    Email address: sarah.gleeson-white@sydney.edu.au
    Phone: +61-2-9351 6853
    Consultation Hours: By appointment – please email to arrange a time.
    Unit Lecturer: Mr Ian David
    Location: S317, John Woolley Building A20
    Email address: ian.david@sydney.edu.au
    Phone: +61-2-9351 4286
    Unit Lecturer: Dr Bruce Isaacs
    Location: 305 RC Mills Building A26
    Email address: bruce.isaacs@sydney.edu.au
    Phone: +61 2 9351 3568
    3
    Unit Lecturer: Dr Susan Potter
    Location: R.C. Mills Building A26
    Email address: susan.potter@sydney.edu.au
    Phone: +61 2 9114 0552
    Unit Lecturer: Dr Richard Smith
    Location: R.C. Mills Building A26
    Email address: r.smith@sydney.edu.au
    Phone: +61 2 9351 4208
    Unit Lecturer: Dr James Wierzbicki
    Location: Seymour Centre J09
    Email address: james.wierzbicki@sydney.edu.au
    Phone: +61-2-9351 2066
    Unit Tutors
    Mr Ian David (as above)
    Dr Sarah Gleeson-White (as above)
    Dr Isabelle Hesse
    Location: N309 John Woolley Building, A20
    Email address: Isabelle.hesse@sydney.edu.au
    Phone: +61 2 93516859
    Consultation Hours: Wednesday 12-1 pm (or by appointment)
    Dr Fiona Lee
    Location: S318 John Woolley Building, A20
    Email address: fiona.lee@sydney.edu.au
    Phone: + 61 2 9451 2978
    Consultation Hours: Tuesdays 2-3pm, and by appointment
    Elena Sarno
    Location: Woolley Room S312
    Email address: esar8649@uni.sydney.edu.au
    Consultation Hours: Tuesday 2-3pm
    Anna Breckon
    Location: Woolley Room S312
    Email address: anna.breckon@sydney.edu.au
    Consultation Hours: By appointment – please email to arrange a time
    This Unit of Study Outline MUST be read in conjunction with the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
    Student Administration Manual
    (sydney.edu.au/arts/current_students/student_admin_manual.shtml) and all applicable
    University policies.
    In determining applications and appeals, it will be assumed that every student has taken the time to
    familiarise themselves with these key policies and procedures.
    ENGL1011 INTRODUCTION TO FILM STUDIES
    UNIT DESCRIPTION
    How do form and style structure our experience of film? This unit provides a critical
    introduction to elements of film production and viewing, moving through an exploration of
    formal components of film to consider film aesthetics in relation to the history of film
    scholarship. We will consider films in a variety of cultural and historical contexts, from early
    cinema to digital technologies, and introduce a series of case studies to explore historical,
    cultural and material contexts of film production and consumption.
    PREREQUISITES
    There are no mandatory or recommended prerequisites.
    LEARNING OUTCOMES
    Students will be able to:
    • Analyse film shots and sequences utilising the language of film analysis
    • Introduce and explore basic concepts in film analysis and interpretation
    • Articulate key concepts in film studies scholarship, such as auteurism, genre theory, and
    national cinemas
    • Articulate the historical, cultural, and material contexts that underpin concepts such as
    genre, auteur, spectator, and audience
    • Relate film analysis and interpretation to wider historical, cultural and material processes
    • Analyse new cinema forms within a field of changing technologies and media structures
    LEARNING STRUCTURE
    • Lecture: 1 x 2hrs per week
    Tuesdays 11am-1pm, Wallace Lecture Theatre
    * All lectures will be recorded and made available through the Blackboard site.
    • Tutorial: 1 x 1hr per week
    You will have been assigned a tutorial time during enrolment. It is imperative that you
    attend this tutorial throughout semester.
    • Screening: 1 x 3hrs per week
    Thursdays 11am-2pm, Old Geology Lecture Theatre
    The unit will screen one feature film each week. If you cannot attend the screening, it is
    imperative that you view the film in your own time prior to the tutorial. It is expected that
    you will be familiar with the film during tutorial discussions.
    All films screened in this unit are available for viewing on DVD through Fisher Library and
    Schaeffer Library. While DVDs are not for loan, each library has excellent viewing facilities
    for individuals and small groups. To locate a DVD, search the library catalogue by title.
    UNIT SCHEDULE
    Semester Two 2016
    Week Week
    beginning
    Lecture and Screening Tutorial
    1 25 July Why Film?: Introduction to Film
    Studies (SGW/BI)
    No tutorials Week 1
    Screening: Hugo (Scorsese, 2011)
    2 01 August Film Form: Technology, Images,
    Narrative (BI)
    Introduction to unit
    Screening: The Cabinet of Dr Caligari
    (Wiene, 1920)
    3 08 August The Evolution of Film Style (BI) Film Form
    Screening: Casablanca (Curtiz, 1942)
    4 15 August Storytelling: Film Narrative (BI) Form and Style:
    GermanENGL1011:代寫 Introduction to Film Studies代寫
    Expressionism
    Screening: Citizen Kane (Welles,
    1941)
    5 22 August Case Study: Orson Welles, Hollywood
    Rebel (BI)
    Story, Plot, Narrative
    Screening: The Artist (Hazanavicius,
    2011)
    6 29 August Sound and Vision: Listening to Film
    (BI). Special Guest: Jenny Ward:
    Award-Winning Film Sound/Dialogue
    Practitioner
    Welles and
    Hollywood
    Screening: Cat People (Tourneur,
    1942)
    7 05 September Film Music (JW) Film Sound
    Screening: Fargo (Coen Brothers,
    1996)
    8 12 September The Screenplay as Film Form (ID) Film Music
    Screening: Marie Antoinette (Coppola,
    2006)
    9 19 September Film and/as Ideology (BI) The Screenplay
    Screening: À Bout de Souffle
    (Breathless) (Godard, 1960)
    BREAK 26 Sept – 02
    Oct
    SESSION BREAK
    10 03 October* Auteurs and Auteur Theory (SP) Film and/as Ideology
    Screening: High Noon (Zinnemann,
    1952)
    11 10 October Film Genre (SP) Auteur Theory
    Screening: Unfriended (Gabriadze,
    2014)
    12 17 October The Digital Turn, or, “Where are we
    now?” (RS)
    Genre
    Screening: TBA
    13 24 October Film Studies: Histories,
    Projections/Conclusion (SGW)
    The Digital Turn
    No screening
    STUVAC 31 October STUVAC
    EXAMS 07 November EXAM PERIOD commences
    * NB: Public holiday on Monday 3 October.
    Two important notes on the unit of study schedule:
    • The film screened each week relates to the lecture topic of the following week. Thus, from
    the schedule, Hugo screens in week 1, but is discussed in the lecture on “Film Form” in
    week 2; similarly, Marie Antoinette is screened in week 8, but is discussed in the lecture
    on “Film and/as Ideology” in week 9.
    • Tutorial topics lag one week behind lecture topics. Thus, the lecture on “The Evolution of
    Film Style” in week 3 is discussed in the tutorial in week 4, and so on. This gives you time
    to reflect on the materials in preparation for the tutorial discussion.
    Please see the Appendix for a detailed schedule of Tutorial Readings
    and Questions.
    ATTENDANCE
    According to Faculty Board Resolutions, students in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
    are expected to attend 80% of their classes. If you attend less than 50% of classes,
    regardless of the reasons, you may be referred to the Examiner’s Board. The Examiner’s
    Board will decide whether you should pass or fail the unit of study if your attendance falls
    below this threshold.
    If a unit of study has a participation mark, your attendance may influence this mark.
    For more information on attendance, see
    http://sydney.edu.au/arts/current_students/policies.shtml.
    READING REQUIREMENTS
    There are two major sources of readings for this unit:
    • Unit of Study textbook:
    David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson, Film Art: An Introduction (10th Edition).
    The textbook is available for purchase in hard copy through the University Co-op
    bookshop located on the ground floor of the Sports and Aquatic Centre (G09). It is also
    available in Fisher Library and Schaeffer Library (in the RC Mills building). There are
    copies in the 2hr collection in Fisher.
    The textbook is also available in electronic form at a reduced cost through the McGraw-Hill
    website: https://create.mheducation.com/shop/#/catalog/details/?isbn=9781308217383
    As the textbook is foundational reading for the entire unit, you will need to use it in
    preparation for lectures, tutorials and assessment tasks.
    • Further Electronic Readings:
    Are available through the Blackboard site. Click on the icon, “eReserve Readings,” and
    click on the ‘author’ tab to alphabetize the list of readings by author surname. Then simply
    click on the hyperlink and download the reading as a pdf.
    In the Detailed Tutorial/Reading Schedule at the end of this outline, all electronically
    held readings are marked [ER].
    ONLINE COMPONENTS
    This unit requires regular use of the University’s Learning Management System (LMS), also
    known as Blackboard. You will need reliable access to a computer and the internet to use the
    LMS. The University uses learning analytics to understand student participation on the LMS
    and improve the student learning experience.
    The easiest way to access the LMS is through MyUni (click on the ‘MyUni’ link on the
    university home page, http://sydney.edu.au or link directly to the service at
    https://myuni.sydney.edu.au/. There is a ‘Blackboard LMS’ icon in the top row of the
    QuickLaunch window on the left hand side of the screen.
    If you have any difficulties logging in or using the system, visit the Student Help area of the
    LMS site, http://sydney.edu.au/elearning/student/help/.
    The University’s Privacy Management Plan governs how the University will deal with personal
    information related to the content and use of its web sites. See
    http://sydney.edu.au/privacy.shtml for further details.
    Lecture Recording
    Lectures delivered in University-owned lecture theatres are recorded and may be made
    available to students on the LMS. However, you should not rely on lecture recording to
    substitute your classroom learning experience.
    ASSESSMENT TASKS AND DUE DATES
    All assessment tasks in this unit must be submitted online through the Blackboard site. From
    the Blackboard menu, click on Assessment Dropboxes, which will take you to the Compliance
    Declaration Forms (your electronic cover sheet required for submission) and the Submission
    Boxes for each assessment task. Note that you are required to complete the Compliance
    Declaration before you are granted access to the Submission Box. In the Submission Box,
    follow the instructions to upload your assessment as a word document.
    For more information on assessment task submission, see the ‘Instructions for Online
    Submission’ in the Assessment Dropboxes page, or ask your tutor.
    Assessment
    Name Individual /
    Group Length Weight Due Time Due Date
    Film Sequence
    Analysis
    Individual 1,000
    words
    25% 11:59pm Wed 7
    September
    Reflective Journal Individual 1,500
    words
    30% 11:59pm Friday 7
    October
    Research Essay Individual 2,000
    words
    35% 11:59pm Thurs 3
    November
    Tutorial
    Participation &
    Attendance
    Individual N/A 10% Weekly Weekly
    1. Film Sequence Analysis (1,000 wds). Weighting 25%
    Due Wednesday Sep 7, 11:59pm
    Select a sequence from one film discussed in Modules 1 and 2 of the unit (see Detailed
    Tutorial Schedule below) and offer an analysis of the function of ‘film form’ within the
    sequence. While a film sequence is relatively open as a descriptive category, I encourage you
    to limit the sequence to a manageable duration.
    In your analysis, you may wish to consider the following formal film elements:
    • The Shot as film unit (Bordwell and Thompson, Chapters 4 and 5).
    A film sequence is a collection of shots strategically set in relation to each other. Prior to
    embarking on your written analysis, you should view your sequence as a breakdown of
    individual shots. Consider how these shots impact on the sequence as a whole.
    Within the shot, you may choose to consider mise en scène (‘in the frame’) and
    cinematography (including lighting, position and movement of the camera, and duration).
    • Montage (Bordwell and Thompson, Chapter 6).
    In Bordwell and Thompson, the concept of montage (shots in relation to each other) is
    covered under “The Relation of Shot to Shot”. What is the ‘montage strategy’ employed in
    the sequence you have chosen? Is the sequence founded upon a series of shots building
    ‘continuity’, ‘discontinuity’ or a combination of the two? And what is the effect of this series
    of cuts within your chosen sequence? To take an example, what is the effect/function of
    the ‘jump cut’ in an early sequence in Godard’s À Bout de Souffle [Breathless], examined
    in week 9?
    • Sound (Bordwell and Thompson, Chapter 7)
    Consider the effect of diegetic and non-diegetic sound in your sequence. In what way does
    sound work with (or even against) the visual field? What is the overall effect of sound on
    your engagement with the sequence as a whole? Can sound enhance the function of
    visual formal elements? Can sound work autonomously – that is, can its function ever be
    separated from the visual image of film?
    • Narrative (Bordwell and Thompson, Chapter 3).
    Mainstream film has evolved primarily as a narrative form. However, narrative is more than
    simply ‘story and character’. In your analysis, consider the how of storytelling. How does
    your sequence reveal a ‘narrational strategy’ above and beyond story, character and
    theme? How is this story being told to us? And what is the purpose of this mode of
    storytelling?
    In this assessment, you may build on your sequence analysis by strategically drawing on
    topics discussed in Module 2: the screenplay as film form, film genre, auteur cinema, film and
    ideology, new digital cinema, etc. However, your sequence analysis should draw on and
    identify formal elements outlined above: ‘the shot’, ‘montage’, ‘sound’, and ‘narrative’,
    exploring their function as formal strategies in production, and their effect on on the spectator.
    For an example of a formal examination of a sequence, see my analysis of a scene in
    Hitchcock’s Vertigo, in the ‘Film Clips Archive’ in Blackboard.
    2. Reflective Journal: ‘The Film Viewing Experience’ (1,500 wds). Weighting: 30%
    Due Friday October 7, 11:59pm.
    Maxim Gorky’s account of a film viewing experience in July, 1896:
    “I was at Aumont’s and saw Lumière’s cinematograph – moving
    photography. The extraordinary impression it creates is so unique
    and complex that I doubt my ability to describe it with all its
    nuances… As you gaze at it, you see carriages, buildings and
    people in various poses, all frozen into immobility… But suddenly a
    strange flicker passes through the screen and the picture stirs to
    life. Carriages coming from somewhere in the perspective of the
    picture are moving straight at you, into the darkness in which you
    sit; somewhere from afar people appear and loom larger as they
    come closer to you… All this moves, teems with life and, upon
    approaching the edge of the screen, vanishes somewhere beyond
    it…”
    In Walter Murch, “Black and White and in Color,”
    McSweeney’s, Oct 3, 2007.
    This assessment requires you to keep a reflective journal of your experience of film viewing in
    this unit of study. In your journal, you are required to comment on at least 4 films screened
    during semester, paying attention not only to your response to the film (i.e. “what I thought of
    the film”), but the conditions of viewing – was it a unit of study screening, was it viewed in
    isolation on a laptop, or with friends at a public screening? What is the unique affect of a
    viewing experience, rather than simply ‘a film’?
    In the journal, I want you to consider:
    • Your evaluation: what did you think of the film, or films, or the films in comparison? But
    evaluation is a critical process; it is not purely a matter of personal taste. For two excellent
    pieces on approaches to film analysis and criticism, see:
    Bordwell and Thompson, “Evaluation: Good, Bad, or Indifferent,” pp. 60-62; and David
    Bordwell, “Studying Cinema,” David Bordwell’s Website on Cinema, 2000, accessed May
    20, 2014, http://www.davidbordwell.net/essays/studying.php
    • A personal assessment of your experience – how were you ‘affected’ by the film/s
    throughout semester?
    As a reader of your journal, I’m looking for subtle, exploratory, adventurous readings of
    how you ‘experience’ cinema. How have these films impacted on you as spectator – or as
    the member of an audience? How does the film experience enter into the wider context of
    your life experience? How have these films come to mean something to you?
    • Your engagement with the film within the context of the unit as a whole.
    How has your viewing experience been enriched through the various film studies
    discourses we’ve opened up in the course? How has the material in lectures, tutorial
    discussions, and your readings enriched your viewing of the films each week? How has
    the material enriched your capacity to reflect on this body of cinema?
    While I encourage you to attend all screenings, I understand that this will not be possible for
    all. Thus, I ask you to be sensitive to the unique form of your viewing experience. In your
    selection of films, reflect upon your relationship to the series of films you’ve chosen as a
    whole. In this assessment, you thus become a curator of a program, providing a reflective
    rationale for your selection of films.
    While this is a personal reflection of a viewing experience, it is not a diary. You should
    reference any material cited, and situate your written reflections within a scholarly discourse. I
    encourage you to reflect on your subjective response to the films, but this response should
    nonetheless be contextualized within the broader field of study in the unit.
    Last (and I can’t stress this enough): your journal should be a work informed through
    development and reflection. It should be maintained, added to, revised, raised as a topic for
    discussion in tutorials, and so on, as you progress through the unit. It should not be cobbled
    together on the morning of submission! I would anticipate anywhere from three to ten
    separate entries in your journal.
    3. Research Essay (2,000 wds). Weighting 35%
    Due Thursday November 3, 11:59pm.
    A series of topics for the research essay will be provided in week 7, and discussed in detail in
    tutorials. Your essay must examine at least two films on the course not examined in
    assessment 1 (Film Sequence Analysis). However, you are free to use any films discussed
    in your Reflective Journal as the basis for your Research Essay.
    4. Tutorial Participation Mark. Weighting 10%
    Tutorials are a space in which to present ideas in an open, interactive forum. Tutorials in the
    unit of study should be thought of as collaborative and organic. You will find your tutorial a
    friendly, welcoming space, as you work between small and large group discussions. It is
    expected that you will complete required reading prior to you tutorial each week.
    LIBR1000: Library and Research Skills – Non-Assessable Online Quiz
    In addition to the assessment tasks of the unit, you are required to complete an online quiz on
    Library and Research Skills. This quiz is not assessable, though completion of the quiz is
    required to pass the unit. The quiz must be completed by 5pm, October 5.
    In Blackboard, click on the ‘LIBR1000 Quiz’ icon and follow the instructions to work your way
    through the library tutorials. When you have completed the library tutorials, you are ready to
    attempt the LIBR1000 Quiz! If you have previously completed the LIBR1000 Quiz, there is no
    need to attempt it again.
    ALL ASSESSMENT TASKS MUST BE COMPLETED TO PASS THIS UNIT OF
    STUDY
    ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
    This unit uses standards-based assessment for award of assessment marks. Your
    assessments will be evaluated solely on the basis of your individual performance.
    SUBMISSION OF ASSESSMENTS
    Compliance Statements
    All students are required to submit an authorised statement of compliance with all work
    submitted to the University for assessment, presentation or publication. A statement of
    compliance certifies that no part of the work constitutes a breach of the Academic Honesty in
    Coursework Policy 2016.
    The format of the compliance statement will be in the form of:
    a. a University assignment cover sheet; or
    b. a University electronic form.
    Assessment Submission
    Submission of assessment tasks will be required by the due date. Written assessments must
    be submitted online through the LMS. Other assessments, for example visual or oral
    assessments, must be submitted according to the assessment instructions.
    Work not submitted on or before the due date are subject to a penalty of 2% per day late.
    Refer to http://sydney.edu.au/arts/current_students/late_work.shtml for the Policy on
    Late Work.
    ACADEMIC DISHONESTY AND PLAGIARISM
    Academic honesty is a core value of the University, so all students are required to act
    honestly, ethically and with integrity. This means that the University is opposed to and will not
    tolerate academic dishonesty or plagiarism, and will treat all allegations of academic
    dishonesty and plagiarism seriously. The consequences of engaging in plagiarism and
    academic dishonesty, along with the process by which they are determined and applied, are
    set out in the Academic Honesty in Coursework Policy 2016. You can find these documents
    University Policy Register at http://sydney.edu.au/policies (enter “Academic Honesty” in the
    search field).
    Definitions
    According to the Policy, plagiarism means representing another person’s work (i.e., ideas,
    findings or words) as one’s own work by presenting, copying or reproducing it without
    appropriate acknowledgement of the source. Academic dishonesty means seeking to
    obtain or obtaining academic advantage for oneself or others (including in the assessment or
    publication of work) by dishonest or unfair means. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not
    limited to:
    • Resubmission (or recycling) of work that is the same, or substantially the same as
    work previously submitted for assessment in the same or in a different unit of study.
    Every unit of study expects each student to produce new material based upon
    research conducted in that unit;
    • Dishonest plagiarism;
    • Engaging another person to complete or contribute to an assessment in your place;
    and
    • Various forms of misconduct in examinations (including copying from another student
    and taking prohibited materials into an examination venue).
    Use of Similarity Detection Software
    Students should be aware that all written assignments submitted in this unit of study will be
    submitted to similarity detecting software known as Turnitin. Turnitin searches for matches
    between text in your written assessment task and text sourced from the Internet, published
    works, and assignments that have previously been submitted to Turnitin for analysis.
    There will always be some degree of text-matching when using Turnitin. Text-matching may
    occur in use of direct quotations, technical terms and phrases, or the listing of bibliographic
    material. This does not mean you will automatically be accused of academic dishonesty or
    plagiarism, although Turnitin reports may be used as evidence in academic dishonesty and
    plagiarism decision-making processes. Further information about Turnitin is available at
    http://sydney.edu.au/arts/current_students/plagiarism_and_turnitin.shtml.
    SPECIAL CONSIDERATION
    Students can apply for Special Consideration for serious illness or misadventure. An
    application for special consideration does not guarantee the application will be granted.
    Further information on applying for special consideration is available at
    http://sydney.edu.au/arts/current_students/special_consideration.shtml.
    OTHER POLICIES AND PROCEDURES RELEVANT TO THIS UNIT OF
    STUDY
    The Faculty’s Student Administration Manual is available for reference here
    http://sydney.edu.au/arts/current_students/student_admin_manual.shtml. Most day-today
    issues you encounter in the course of completing this Unit of Study can be addressed
    with the information provided in the Manual. It contains detailed instructions on processes,
    links to forms and guidance on where to get further assistance.
    YOUR FEEDBACK IS IMPORTANT
    The Unit of Study Survey
    The University conducts an online survey for units of study every semester. You will be
    notified by email when the survey opens. You are encouraged to complete the survey to
    provide important feedback on the unit just before the end of semester. You can complete
    the survey at http://www.itl.usyd.edu.au/surveys/complete
    How Student Feedback has been used to develop this Unit of Study
    Student feedback has informed the ongoing development of this course.
    STAYING ON TOP OF YOUR STUDY
    For full information visit
    http://sydney.edu.au/arts/current_students/staying_on_top.shtml
    The Learning Centre offers workshops in Academic Reading and Writing, Oral
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    http://libguides.library.usyd.edu.au/.
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    on the mobile app for the University LMS can be found in detail in this PDF document:
    Features in the mobile App for the University LMS (PDF). Search for University of Sydney
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    OTHER SUPPORT SERVICES
    Disability Services is located on Level 5, Jane Foss Russell Building G20; contact 8627
    8422 or email disability.services@sydney.edu.au. For further information, visit their website
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    DETAILED SCHEDULE OF TUTORIAL READINGS AND QUESTIONS
    Week 1: 25 Jul –
    There are no tutorials this week.
    MODULE 1
    UNDERSTANDING FILM FORM AND ITS FUNCTION
    Week 2: 1 Aug –
    Course introduction
    Required Reading
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “The Significance of Film Form,” pp. 50-60.
    − Tom Gunning, “The Cinema of Attractions: Early Film, Its Spectator and the Avant-
    Garde,” in Early Cinema: Space, Frame, Narrative, ed. Thomas Elsaesser (London:
    BFI, 1990), pp. 56-62. [ER]
    Tutorial Discussion
    Why study film?
    Week 3: 8 Aug –
    Film Form: Hugo; Arrival of a Train at the Station; A Trip to the Moon
    Note: there is a bit of textbook reading this week to flesh out key background concepts in your
    engagement with film form. But rest assured, this material underpins all of our discussions of
    film form in Module 1.
    Required Reading/Viewing
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “The Shot: Mise en Scène,” pp. 112-133.
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Putting It All Together: Mise en Scène in Space and Time,”
    pp. 140-154.
    Additional Reading/Viewing
    − Sergei Eisenstein, “Beyond the Shot [The Cinematographic Principle and the
    Ideogram],” Film Theory and Criticism: Introductory Readings, ed. Leo Braudy and
    Marshall Cohen (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 27-34. [ER]
    Note: this is a challenging but very important reading in the history of film theory.
    What does Eisenstein mean when he suggests that montage (and all of cinema, for
    that matter) is more than a “succession of shots”?
    − Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
    − Kristin Thompson, “Hugo: Scorsese’s birthday present to Georges Méliès,” David
    Bordwell’s Website on Cinema (blog), 7 Dec. 2011,
    http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/2011/12/07/hugo-scorseses-birthdaypresent-
    to-georges-melies/
    Tutorial Discussion
    Consider the Lumière Brothers’ Arrival of a Train at a Station (1896), Méliès’ Trip to the Moon
    (1902), and Scorsese’s Hugo (2011). In what sense do these films reveal a rich history of film
    form? You may wish to consider technology (film and digital production), formal image
    elements such as mise en scène (the contents of the frame), cinematography (particularly
    light and movement) and editing, and the use of narrative (or non-narrative) conventions.
    Discuss the famous opening sequence of Hugo as a ‘sequence shot’. What makes this shot
    such a striking example of how cinema has evolved from the time of the Lumière Brothers to
    today? Consider early and recent films as forms of what Tom Gunning calls “a cinema of
    attractions.”
    Week 4: 15 Aug –
    Form and Style: German Expressionism. The Cabinet of Dr Caligari
    Required Reading
    − Paul Cooke, “From Caligari to Edward Scissorhands: The Continuing Meta-Cinematic
    Journey of German Expressionism,” World Cinema’s ‘Dialogues’ With Hollywood, ed.
    Paul Cooke (London: Palgrave, 2007), pp. 17-34. [This book is held electronically –
    search the library catalogue by title and link to the full text.]
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “German Expressionism,” pp. 469-472.
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Framing,” pp. 178-182.
    Additional Reading/Viewing
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “The Shot: Cinematography,” pp. 160-215. This chapter is
    extremely detailed in its examination of various aspects of cinematography. However,
    it is critical foundational material for Module 1 and Assessment 1.
    − Un Chien Andalou [The Andalusian Dog] (Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí, 1929)
    − Nosferatu (F. W. Murnau, 1922)
    − The Third Man (Carol Reed, 1949)
    Tutorial Discussion
    How do the formal qualities of The Cabinet of Dr Caligari (and the style of German
    Expressionism) provide an experience of anxiety and fear? Consider specifically mise en
    scène in Caligari. In what sense does the film display a world out of kilter? How is
    ‘expressionist style’ realized through the devices of framing, contrast, and set design? Time
    permitting, you may wish to consider the effect of transposing Caligari’s German
    Expressionist style to contemporary Hollywood in Scorsese’s loose remake, Shutter Island
    (2010). Is Scorsese’s ‘image’ of madness as convincing as Wiene’s?
    Week 5: 22 Aug –
    Story, Plot, Narrative. Casablanca
    Required Reading
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Narrative Form,” pp. 72-97.
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “The Classical Hollywood Cinema,” pp. 97-99;
    − Peter Wollen, “Godard and Counter Cinema: Vent D’Est,” Movies and Methods,
    Volume 2, ed. Bill Nichols (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press,
    1985), pp. 501-508. [ER]
    Additional Reading/Viewing
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Continuity Editing,” pp. 233-238.
    − Warren Buckland, “Introduction: Puzzle Plots,” Puzzle Films: Complex Storytelling in
    Contemporary Cinema (London: Blackwell, 2009), pp. 1-13.
    − Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry, 2004)
    − Lola Rennt [Run Lola Run] (Tom Tykwer, 1998)
    Tutorial Discussion
    Casablanca utilizes what Bordwell and Thompson call ‘classical’ narrative form. How do they
    define classical narrative within the Hollywood production mode? Consider the sequence in
    which Rick is first introduced to the spectator. In what way is his revelation a strategic
    narrative device, that is, a way of situating his character (and Bogart as screen persona)
    within the broader narrative frame of the film? View the final glorious sequence in which Rick
    and Ilsa take leave (sadly!) of each other. Would you describe this as a distinctly classical
    narrational outcome? In what way does this famous ending depict a classical narrational
    logic? Wollen argues aggressively for a “counter-cinema,” deploying radically different forms
    of narrative structure. Can you think of any films that challenge the classical narrational logic
    displayed in Casablanca? To start you off, what on earth is going on in that final shot in
    Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind?
    Week 6: 29 Aug –
    Welles and Hollywood: Citizen Kane
    Required Reading
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Narrative Form in Citizen Kane,” pp. 99-109.
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Frame Mobility: Functions,” pp. 200-204.
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Duration of the Image,” pp. 210-216.
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “The Lens: Depth of Field and Focus,” pp. 174-175
    Additional Reading/Viewing
    − André Bazin, "The Evolution of the Language of Cinema," in What Is Cinema?
    Volume 1, trans. Hugh Gray (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California
    Press, 1967), pp. 23-40. [ER]
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Spatial and Temporal Discontinuity,” pp. 257-264.
    − The Lady From Shanghai (Orson Welles, 1947)
    − Touch of Evil (Orson Welles, 1958)
    Tutorial Discussion
    In terms of film form, Citizen Kane is the true curiosity of the Hollywood studio cinema: it is
    classical in style, and yet deeply experimental. In your tutorial discussion, you might consider
    aspects of mise en scène, cinematography, editing and narrative form, all now very famous
    elements of Citizen Kane, all underpinning the emergence of Welles as Hollywood’s most
    visible ‘auteur’. Discuss the use of the ‘long take’ and ‘deep focus’ in a sequence in Citizen
    Kane, or in the opening to Welles’s Touch of Evil (1958). What is the purpose of these highly
    expressive formal film elements? What is the function of ‘Rosebud’ within the narrational logic
    of the film?
    MODULE 2
    FORM, INTERPRETATION, THEORY
    Week 7: 5 Sep –
    Film Sound: The Artist
    Required Reading
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Sound in the Cinema,” pp. 266-298.
    − Michel Chion, “Projections of Sound on Image,” Audio-Vision: Sound on Screen,
    trans. Claudia Gorbman (New York: Columbia University Press, 1994), pp. 3-24. [ER]
    Additional Reading/Viewing
    − Roger Ebert, “The Artist” (Review). December 21, 2011. Accessed 19 June, 2014,
    http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/the-artist-2011
    − Sarah Kozloff, “Integration,” Overhearing Film Dialogue (Berkeley: University of
    California Press, 2000), pp. 90-139. [This book is held electronically – search the
    library catalogue by title and link to the full text.]
    − Singin’ in the Rain (Stanley Donen, 1952)
    − The Conversation (Francis Ford Coppola, 1974)
    Tutorial Discussion
    Michel Chion suggests that sound has conventionally been thought of as part of the visual
    image, or even as emanating from the visual image. I would argue that this is our most
    common spectatorial engagement with sound in film: often peripheral to our viewing
    experience, almost an afterthought. Thus, Chion coins the term “added value” – sound merely
    adds value to what is already there in the visual field. But can sound do more? Can sound be
    a fundamental part of the meaning-making process of film? Can sound even work against our
    expectations derived from visual form? In its most radical incarnation in cinema, can sound
    work autonomously from the visual image? Consider the transition to sound cinema in the late
    1920s. What must that experience of film sound have been like for the spectator attuned to a
    silent cinema? What would you say to a filmmaker like F. W. Murnau, who argued that the
    coming of sound would effectively destroy film as an art form?
    Week 8: 12 Sep –
    Film Music: Cat People; 2001: A Space Odyssey; Jaws
    Required Reading
    − James Wierzbicki, “Film Music in the Post-Classical Period (1958-2008),” Film Music:
    A History (London: Routledge, 2010), pp. 187-236. [E-book]
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Sound in the Cinema,” pp. 266-298 (revise from last week).
    Tutorial Discussion
    Two of the most famous scenes in ‘Cat People’ are those involving the bus and the swimming
    pool. How does ‘sound’ affect these scenes? Would the scenes benefit from underscore?
    Speaking of films in general, when does film music rise to the foreground and when does it
    remain, to use the phrase from Claudia Gorbman’s book and Keats’s poem, an ‘unheard
    melody’? Is a musical accompaniment, or an underscore, really necessary in the modern
    film? Can you think of any films that are almost devoid of music? Can you think of any films in
    which there seems to be too much music? Or inappropriate music?
    Week 9: 19 Sep –
    The Screenplay: Fargo
    Required Reading
    − Joel Coen and Ethan Coen, Fargo (Screenplay), 1996,
    http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/Fargo.txt
    − Kevin Boon, “Form and Function: The Evolution of the Screenplay,” Script Culture
    and the American Screenplay (Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2008), pp. 3-
    24. [ER]
    Additional Reading/Viewing
    − Herman J. Mankiewicz and Orson Welles, Citizen Kane (Screenplay), 1941,
    http://www.dailyscript.com/scripts/citizenkane.html
    − Steven Maras, Screenwriting: History, Theory and Practice, (Wallflower Press, 2009)
    Tutorial Discussion
    What essential functions does the screenplay perform in filmmaking? When considering
    narrative in film, is it meaningful to regard the screenplay as separate from the film; simply a
    document suggesting character, theme and subtext? Bordwell and Thompson consider the
    screenplay as another of the elements of film form, possessing the same status as montage
    or sound. Does this assessment, deny the screenwriter authorship in the film? Increasingly,
    screenplays are being published and read on their own. Can a screenplay possess value as
    a document without reference to the completed film that bears its name?
    Week 10: 3 Oct –
    Film and/as Ideology: Marie Antoinette
    Required Reading
    − Theodor Adorno, “Culture Industry Reconsidered,” The Audiences Studies Reader,
    ed. Will Brooker and Deborah Jermyn (London: Routledge, 2003), pp. 55-60. [ER]
    − Suzanne Ferriss and Mallory Young, “Marie Antoinette: Fashion, Third-Wave
    Feminism, and Chick Culture,” Literature/Film Quarterly 38/2 (2010), pp. 98-116. [ER]
    Additional Reading/Viewing
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Form, Style, and Ideology,” pp. 438-449.
    − Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)
    Tutorial Discussion
    All film is ideological. All film is depicted through a lens that offers a very particular vision of
    the world. Do you agree? Is Coppola’s Marie Antoinette a ‘cinema of attractions’? How is
    Versailles constructed as a virtual space and Dunst’s teenage Marie Antoinette a virtual
    historical figure? In what sense is Coppola’s vision of the past (the late 18th century) in fact a
    reflection of our present attitudes toward identity and history? In what sense is spectatorship
    in Marie Antoinette a form of consumption? What is the function of music in the “I Love
    Candy” montage – diegetic and non-diegetic? Offer a reading of Coppola’s film as teen genre
    cinema
    Week 11: 10 Oct –
    Auteur: À Bout de Souffle [Breathless]
    Required Reading
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “The French New Wave (1959-1964),” pp. 485-488
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Breathless,” pp. 415-420.
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “The New Hollywood and Independent Filmmaking, 1970s-
    1980s,” pp. 488-494.
    − Peter Wollen, “From Signs and Meaning in the Cinema: The Auteur Theory [Howard
    Hawks and John Ford]” in Film Theory and Criticism, ed. Brady and Cohen. 7th ed.
    (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), 455-470. [ER]
    Tutorial Discussion
    To be confirmed.
    Week 12: 17 Oct –
    Film Genre: High Noon
    Required Reading
    − Bordwell and Thompson, “Film Genres,” pp. 328-348.
    − Bordwell and Thompson, "The 1980s and After,” pp. 491-492.
    − Bordwell and Thompson,"Hollywood and Independents, To Be Continued,” pp. 493-
    494.
    − Richard Maltby, “Chapter Four: Genre,” 74-110 (notes 608-612) in Hollywood
    Cinema, 2nd ed. (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2003). [ER]
    Tutorial Discussion
    To be confirmed.
    Week 13: 24 Oct –
    Film and Digital: Unfriended
    Required Reading/Viewing
    Additional Reading/Viewing
    Tutorial Discussion
    To be confirmed
    ENGL1011:代寫 Introduction to Film Studies代寫

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